Scientists Find A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man

Scientists Find A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man

Japanese scientists from Kurashiki University of Science and Arts are working to unravel the mystery of the mummification of the 300-year-old mermaid man with a human face, found in a temple in the city of Asakuchi.

Japan – Scientists are working to unravel the mystery of the mummification of the 300-year-old “mermaid” with a human face, which in legends is said to grant immortality to those who tasted its flesh.
The mysterious 12-inch-long creature is claimed to have been found off the Japanese island of Shikoku, between 1736 and 1741.
Scientists Find A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man
A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man
The “mermaid” has a frightening human appearance, as it appears with a grinned face, pointed teeth and hands, and hair on its head and forehead, but its lower half resembles a fish tail.
Researchers from Kurashiki University of Science and Arts took the mummy for a CT scan, in an attempt to unravel its secrets. The strange creature could have religious significance: “Japanese mermaids have a legend of immortality,” said Hiroshi Kinoshita of the Okayama Folklore Society.
Scientists Find A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man
A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man
He added, “There is a legend in many parts of Japan that a woman accidentally ate mermaid meat and lived 800 years… the legend of Yao Baekuni, also preserved near the temple where the mermaid mummy was found.”
This mummy, which was created from the torso and head of a monkey sewn into the bottom half of a fish, was allegedly caught off the coast of Fiji and later purchased from Japanese sailors.Mermaid Man.
Scientists Find A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man
A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man
In Japanese folklore, there is a creature called “ningyo”, which is described as having a monkey’s mouth with fish-like teeth and a body covered with golden scales. Scientists examining the mummy will publish their results later this year.
Scientists Find A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man
A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man

About Mermaids

In folklore, a mermaid is an aquatic creature with the head and upper body of a female human and the tail of a fish. Mermaids appear in the folklore of many cultures worldwide, including Europe, Asia, and Africa.
In ancient Assyria, the goddess Atargatis transformed herself into a mermaid out of shame for accidentally killing her human lover. Mermaids are sometimes associated with perilous events such as floods, storms, shipwrecks, and drownings. In other folk traditions (or sometimes within the same traditions), they can be benevolent or beneficent, bestowing boons or falling in love with humans.

Scientists Find A 300-Year-Old Mummified Mermaid Man

Mermaid Man is “Merman”

The male equivalent of the mermaid is the merman, also a familiar figure in folklore and heraldry. Although traditions about and sightings of mermen are less common than those of mermaids, they are generally assumed to co-exist with their female counterparts. The male and the female collectively are sometimes referred to as merfolk or merpeople.
The conception of mermaids in the West may have been influenced by the Sirens of Greek mythology, which were originally half-birdlike, but came to be pictured as half-fishlike in the Christian era. Historical accounts of mermaids, such as those reported by Christopher Columbus during his exploration of the Caribbean, may have been sightings of manatees or similar aquatic mammals. While there is no evidence that mermaids exist outside folklore, reports of mermaid sightings continue to the present day.
Mermaids have been a popular subject of art and literature in recent centuries, such as in Hans Christian Andersen’s literary fairy tale “The Little Mermaid” (1836). They have subsequently been depicted in operas, paintings, books, comics, animation, and live action films.
Mermaids appear in British folklore as unlucky omens, both foretelling disaster and provoking it. Several variants of the ballad Sir Patrick Spens depict a mermaid speaking to the doomed ships.
In some versions, she tells them they will never see land again; in others, she claims they are near shore, which they are wise enough to know means the same thing. Mermaids can also be a sign of approaching rough weather,[20] and some have been described as monstrous in size, up to 2,000 feet (610 m).

Author