Samaritan Is A Mediocre B-Movie With An 80’s Atmosphere

Samaritan Is A Mediocre B-Movie With An 80's Atmosphere

The idea behind Samaritan is to offer a critique of the genre and its implicit Manichaeism made up of heroes and villains, but it is a Manichaeism that has long since entered into crisis even in cinema. Available in streaming on Prime video.

Sam is a white boy in a mixed-ethnic neighborhood and has only one friend, a burly black man who is disappointed with his partner’s choices. Sam is in fact poor, he and his mother are one step away from eviction, so he decides to participate in a petty theft in a drugstore together with a gang of young offenders.
So he will end up meeting their boss, Cyrus, who takes a liking to him even though they have two different myths: Sam is a fan of Samaritan, a superhero who fought against his brother Nemesis to save the city, while Cyrus believes that Nemesis was the one who rebelled against an unjust system. Sam is also convinced that Samaritan is not dead but still lives in the city in disguise.

Samaritan Is A Mediocre B-Movie With An 80's Atmosphere

Samaritan was born as a cinematographic subject which then in 2014 also becomes a comic to say the least misunderstood, published in America by Mythos and scripted by Bragi F. Schut, in fact also author of the script of the film. After several productive difficulties, the film – in which Stallone believed so much to produce it – was entrusted to Julius Avery, an Australian director who emerged with the thriller Son of a Gun, but best known for the subsequent and modest Overlord. Unfortunately, it is not with Samaritan that his career will rise again: it is in fact an MGM title that Amazon, the new owner of the Studio for a few months, has decided to distribute directly on its platform. The reason is clear: 80s nostalgia is not enough to make yet another poor superhero film tolerable today.

Samaritan Is A Mediocre B-Movie With An 80's Atmosphere

The idea is to offer a critique of the genre and its implicit Manichaeism made up of heroes and villains, but it is a Manichaeism that has long since entered into crisis even in the cinema, even in the productions of the majors, from the killer Superman of Zack Snyder to the War. Civilized among superheroes who do not want to be regulated by the UN not to mention, of course, the vitriolic satire of The Boys on the platform of the same Amazon. In all this, Samaritan’s reflections turn out to be rose water, cloying in their moral spelled out to the boy and really out of time in the representation of urban crime.
Unfortunately, it is not with this film that the career of director Julius Avery will rise again: Samaritan is in fact an MGM title that Amazon, the new owner of the Studio for a few months, has decided to distribute directly on its platform. The reason is obvious: 80s nostalgia is not enough to make yet another poor superhero film tolerable today.
The idea is to offer a critique of the genre and its implicit Manichaeism made up of heroes and villains, but it is a Manichaeism that has long since entered into crisis even in cinema. Also, also due to the rather tight budget, the costumes look like they came from an amateur cosplayer fair and a scene with stallion de-aging has an old-generation console CGI.
Apart from the sympathy that Stallone can arouse, Samaritan is really a B-Movie of the most mediocre ones.

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