Texas Drought Reveals 113 Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Footprints

Texas Drought Reveals 113 Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Footprints

The drying up of a river in the US state of Texas caused the discovery of footprints in the bottom of a river of dinosaurs that lived about 113 million years ago.

According to the management of the park, which bears the name of Dinosaur Valley, the new discovery may be one of the longest chains of dinosaur footprints in the world.
These deep monuments were previously buried, filled with sediments and submerged in water, which contributed to their preservation.

Texas Drought Reveals 113 Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Footprints

“Severe drought conditions this summer have completely dried up the Paloxi River in most places, revealing new traces in the park,” said Stephanie Salinas-Garcia, an official with the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife.

Texas Drought Reveals 113 Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Footprints

Stephanie Salinas-Garcia pointed out that “most of the effects that were recently discovered in different locations of the river in the park belong to a dinosaur of the type Acrocanthosaurus“, which is one of the two legged animals that can reach five meters in length and weigh seven tons.

Texas Drought Reveals 113 Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Footprints

“The history of dinosaur footprints in the park goes back 113 million years,” Garcia said.
The park was opened in 1972 to protect these ancient monuments, according to its website.

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